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Tuesday, 26 April 2011

Financial reporting does not simply report on what took place

             Financial reporting does not simply report on what took place

            There is no substance in the statement that financial reporting simply reports on what took place. It can be correctly stated that the above statement has no substance when we refer to the IFRS-approved basic accounting option of continuous financial capital maintenance in units of constant purchasing power which requires the valuing of only constant real value non-monetary items in units of constant purchasing power during low inflation and deflation as orginally authorized in the Framework (1989), Par 104 (a) which states: “Financial capital maintenance can be measured in either nominal monetary units or units of constant purchasing power.”

The first option in Par 104 , namely, financial capital maintenance in nominal monetary units during inflation and deflation is a fallacy: it is impossible to maintain the real value of capital constant in nominal monetary units per se during inflation and deflation. Continuous financial capital maintenance in units of constant purchasing power during low inflation and deflation is generally applicable in the economy as a result of the absence of specific IFRS as per IAS 8, Par 11. However, that is not the same as comprehensive CPI-based adjustment of accounts themselves as accountants and accounting authorities automatically assume when financial capital maintenance in units of constant purchasing power during low inflation and deflation is suggested. Only constant real value non-monetary items (not variable real value non-monetary items) are continuously valued in units of constant purchasing power by continuously applying the CPI on a monthly basis during low inflation and deflation to implement a constant purchasing power capital concept of invested constant purchasing power and a constant purchasing power financial capital maintenance concept with measurement in units of constant purchasing power which includes a constant purchasing power profit or loss determination concept with the continuous valuation of only constant real value non-monetary items in units of constant purchasing power during low inflation and deflation.

The real values of banks´ and companies´ existing constant real value non-monetary items never maintained constant, e.g. retained profits, are unnecessarily, unknowingly and unintentionally being eroded at a rate equal to the annual rate of inflation when companies´  boards of directors choose to apply the stable measuring unit assumption as it forms part of the traditional HCA model during low inflation.

It is a fact that continuous financial capital maintenance in units of constant purchasing power (CIPPA) as originally authorized in IFRS in the Framework (1989), Par 104 (a), i.e. measurement of only constant real value non-monetary items (not variable items) in the economy in units of constant purchasing power during low inflation automatically remedies this unknowing, unintentional and unnecessary erosion by the application of the stable measuring unit assumption as it forms part of the HCA model in companies that at least break even whether they own revaluable fixed assets or not and without the requirement of extra capital from capital providers in the form of extra money or extra retained profits simply to maintain the existing constant real value of quity constant.

Nicolaas Smith

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